Most everyone has heard about race discrimination in the workplace, but few understand how it is identified — and how to fight back if you are a victim.

U.S. citizens are protected against being discriminated against in the workplace by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which "prohibits employment discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex and national origin."

At the law office of Adam M. Porter in Birmingham, Alabama, I represent employees of all racial and ethnic backgrounds who have been discriminated against at work. I have more than 25 years of experience helping employees use Alabama and federal employment law to stand up for their rights. I have a thorough understanding of federal and state discrimination laws, as well as the steps involved in successfully proving discrimination in the workplace.

Alabama Racial Harassment Attorney

Race discrimination can be blatantly obvious or extremely subtle. Examples of race discrimination in the workplace include:

  • Excluding people of certain races from consideration for promotions
  • Refusing to hire someone based on race or ethnicity
  • Using race as a criterion for screening out job applicants
  • Ethnic slurs
  • Racially charged jokes
  • Offensive comments based on race

If you feel that you are a victim of racial discrimination, it is important to follow the steps below. Employers often seek to avoid liability by claiming that employees did not use the company's complaint procedure. You should document all complaints and any retaliation that follows any such complaints.

  • Report the situation to your supervisor and/or an HR representative.
  • If you feel that nothing is done to resolve the issue, or that you are being further discriminated against based on your discussion, you need to file a formal complaint with your HR department. Be specific about dates, times, locations, etc., where incidents of discrimination occurred.
  • If company officials do not remedy the situation after you have filed a formal complaint, you should file a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). The EEOC will investigate and may attempt to resolve the matter through mediation, file suit on your behalf, or provide you a "notice of right to sue." This could take up to a year to complete.
  • Hire an experienced employment law attorney to guide you through the process.

Schedule A Free Consultation With A Straight-Talking Lawyer Today

The process for filing a race discrimination lawsuit is complex. There are important deadlines that need to be met or you may lose your right to pursue litigation. It is a good idea to retain the services of an experienced attorney to help you with your case.

It is important to realize that a small percentage of race discrimination lawsuits go to trial. Many are settled; some are denied. And while high-profile discrimination lawsuits net six figures or more, the majority of cases recover far less.

I am adamant about giving people accurate information about race discrimination cases up front so they know what they are facing. I offer free initial consultations, contingency fee arrangements, and evening and weekend appointments. Email me or call 205-588-2261 or toll free at 800-809-5913 to schedule an appointment.